How To Kill Your Customers’ Objections With Your Copy

One of the surest ways to make sure your copywriting converts is to kill upfront and centre any potential objections your ideal customers might have right there in the copy. Start this ad optimizing exercise by taking the top three counters or objections one might have regarding your product or service. Write these three points down, E.G.

  • 1: It is just too expensive.
  • 2: Do other people use this product or service? How many other people? What are they saying?
  • 3: This won’t work for me because I’m different.

Now address the points respectively in some jot-style easy to ready copy, E.G.

  • #1: Too expensive? Hang on, if you’re not 100% satisfied we will refund you in full!
  • #2: Check out what others are saying about this once in a lifetime deal! (Insert some reviews).
  • #3: And before you say “this product won’t work for me” checkout these testimonials of people who said the exact same thing. (We’ve all seen the “at first I was skeptical review” at some point somewhere. There is a reason this is so common).

Think of the popular medicine brand ‘Buckleys’ and their infamous one-liner “It tastes like crap, but it works!”

This immediately addresses the customers likely 2 biggest concerns.

Concern A being: does it actually work? They not only just told you it worked, they told you honestly something most companies might have altogether avoided; that it doesn’t taste good…Making you believe it works even more, because they were so honest in their primary statement. If we were to switch the sentence around and let it hit us with a slightly different rhetoric. “It works, but it tastes like crap!” It wouldn’t have nearly as significant an affect as first addressing the issue of trust. You’ll see why below.

A great example of the importance of addressing the issue of trust first is that of the old-friend cold email that goes as such: “Hey Mac, hope you are doing well, it’s been so long. We have to go for a drink and catch up soon! Oh, and by the way I’m running in this election for such-and-such position and was hoping you could vote for me. Here is the link.”

We’ve all received an email like this at one point or another. Likely from someone we haven’t seen in a while. But had they only opened their message with a slightly different and more appropriate sentence structure, or even the opposite sentence structure, it would have sounded all the more sincere. See the following.

“Hey Mac, I’m running in this election for such-and-such position and was hoping you could vote for me. Here is the link. I know it’s been a while but I hope you are doing well. Would love to go for a drink and catch up soon!”

Doesn’t that sound all the less faked? And you didn’t pander to or flatter anyone in the process!

So Buckley’s with their one liner that I’ve had memorized for who knows how long since that one TV commercial (which runs to this day) addresses their main customers top two concerns with a one-liner that people who haven’t bought the stuff in years can recall. (It’s me, I haven’t bought the stuff in years).

You can find the importance of a one-liner for your business here WHY YOUR COMPANY NEEDS A ONE-LINER/

Concern B being: “we know it tastes like crap, and now you do too.” So that’s definitely not something you’re worrying about anymore is it?

This is how healthy organic food company’s can sell products that taste like absolute garbage. Nowhere on the packaging does it say this product tastes good, it says it is good for you.

So be honest and sincere in addressing your customers… as well as intuitive, alert, and immediate in exposing and understanding their objections.

What objections do your customers, or the ones in your industry likely have?

Write them down! Address them!

~Cheers,

Mackenzie Andres

THE BLOCK BARD

Founder | Head of Copy

http://www.theblockbard.com

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